47

MomTalk.com November 17, 2017:   The women's magazine for moms about children, family, health, home, fashion, careers, marriage & more


MomTalk Most Popular Articles

Most Popular Articles



Sign Up for the MomTalk newsletter today!





Email Marketing by VerticalResponse




Instantly watch from thousands of TV episodes & movies streaming from Netflix. Try Netflix for FREE!



152403_Mar Coupon Code 125x125

Zazzle launches customizable Doodle Speakers

zulily: Daily deals for moms, babies and kids

126905_Shop Green Baby at Diapers.com + Free 2 Day Shipping on $49+

307728_Save Better - 125x125

Mom's Worrying May Improve Baby's Development

A new study reveals that a low level of stress during pregnancy does not harm your baby, but, in fact, may be beneficial to early development. Moms-to-be who cope with normal levels of depression, anxiety or other forms of stress seem to be more likely to have children who are more advanced in mental and motor skills by age two.

"There's a lot of interest in the affects of stress on pregnancy," said Dr. Janet DiPietro, study author from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, "and this is not what other people expect."

A new study reveals that a low level of stress during pregnancy does not harm your baby, but, in fact, may be beneficial to early development. Moms-to-be who cope with normal levels of depression, anxiety or other forms of stress seem to be more likely to have children who are more advanced in mental and motor skills by age two.

"There's a lot of interest in the affects of stress on pregnancy," said Dr. Janet DiPietro, study author from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, "and this is not what other people expect."

In the study, DiPietro and colleagues surveyed 137 women who were having normal pregnancies about their stress and anxiety levels. Those women who had more negative feelings about being pregnant were more likely to have children who scored lower on these behavioral tests.

However, women who reported a moderate level of stress between weeks 24 and 32 in their pregnancy were more likely to have a child who performed better on mental and motor tests than women who reported no stress.
Jump to full text of this article here.



Categories: Pregnancy,


New FeatureRelated Articles: New Fears May Come With Brain Development: Sylvia Rimm on Raising Kids, Understanding Early Sexual Development,