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MomTalk.com November 24, 2017:   The women's magazine for moms about children, family, health, home, fashion, careers, marriage & more


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Keep It Close for Comfort

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When Mary Claire, 8 months, is ready for a nap or bedtime, her mom better have her silk, pink blankie on hand -- or else. Sound familiar? Comfort items, such as blankets, stuffed animals, bottles and pacifiers, take center stage for many children, starting around six months. As infants begin to first discover they are independent people from their parents, they often attach to one special item that helps soothe them when they are feeling cranky, hungry, sick, or tired.

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By Margit Feury

When Mary Claire, 8 months, is ready for a nap or bedtime, her mom better have her silk, pink blankie on hand -- or else. Sound familiar? Comfort items, such as blankets, stuffed animals, bottles and pacifiers, take center stage for many children, starting around six months. As infants begin to first discover they are independent people from their parents, they often attach to one special item that helps soothe them when they are feeling cranky, hungry, sick, or tired. (This is different from a newborn's attachment to a pacifier, bottle, or nipple which satisfy the need to suck.)

According to S. Donald Palmer, M.D., a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics' early childhood committee, "Comfort items provide a child with a sort of familiarity and reassurance that a parent cannot provide every minute of the day and night."

When a baby learns to calm and reassure himself, the parents also benefit. So rather than cry out for you in the middle of the night, your child learns to hug his special teddy bear to ease himself back to sleep. Or instead of begging to be held while you're trying to navigate a crowded mall, your child just clutches his tattered yellow blanket.

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Categories: Babies, Children,


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