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MomTalk.com November 17, 2017:   The women's magazine for moms about children, family, health, home, fashion, careers, marriage & more


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How Much Weight Should You Gain?

pregweight.jpgThere are many things you can do to prepare for the delivery of a healthy baby. One of the most important things is eating right to gain the extra weight you'll need to support another life.



How much?
During your first office visit, your doctor probably will tell you how much weight to gain during the nine months of your pregnancy. It's recommended that most healthy women gain 25 to 35 pounds, but this can vary depending on whether you're overweight or underweight.

pregweight.jpgBy Julianne Deveraux

There are many things you can do to prepare for the delivery of a healthy baby. One of the most important things is eating right to gain the extra weight you'll need to support another life.
How much?
During your first office visit, your doctor probably will tell you how much weight to gain during the nine months of your pregnancy. It's recommended that most healthy women gain 25 to 35 pounds, but this can vary depending on whether you're overweight or underweight. Try for a slow and steady weight gain, but remember that all women gain at different rates.
• During the first trimester, you'll gain only about 1 to 1 1/2 pounds each month.
• During the second trimester, you'll gain about 1/2 to 3/4 of a pound a week.
• During the third trimester, you'll gain about 1 pound a week!
All in all, by your due date, you'll probably feel that your weight gain has been enormous -- especially since a baby weighs only about 7 pounds.

What accounts for all that added weight?
Your total weight gain is almost equally divided between the baby (including placenta and amniotic fluid) and your body (expanded blood volume, uterus growth and enlarged breasts). Normally, there's also a little maternal fat storage, which is essential for a healthy baby.

Your physical well-being
It's important to follow your doctor's recommendation for weight gain because gaining either too little or too much can lead to problems. It's also important to remember it's the quality of the foods you eat rather than the quantity that matters.

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Categories: Pregnancy,


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