47

MomTalk.com June 17, 2018:   The women's magazine for moms about children, family, health, home, fashion, careers, marriage & more


MomTalk Most Popular Articles

Most Popular Articles



Sign Up for the MomTalk newsletter today!





Email Marketing by VerticalResponse




Instantly watch from thousands of TV episodes & movies streaming from Netflix. Try Netflix for FREE!



152403_Mar Coupon Code 125x125

Zazzle launches customizable Doodle Speakers

zulily: Daily deals for moms, babies and kids

126905_Shop Green Baby at Diapers.com + Free 2 Day Shipping on $49+

307728_Save Better - 125x125

Cutting Back on TV Time

cuttingbackTV150.jpgIt's no secret that most kids watch entirely too much television. Developmental psychologists are sounding the alarm, voicing concerns that all this tube time contributes to a wide array of modern childhood problems, from obesity to failure to develop new interests, and even early sexualization. There are ways to ensure that your child is well below the mean when it comes to screen time.

cuttingbackTV.jpg
By Darcy Lockman

It's no secret that most kids watch entirely too much television. Developmental psychologists are sounding the alarm, voicing concerns that all this tube time contributes to a wide array of modern childhood problems, from obesity to failure to develop new interests, and even early sexualization. But concerned parents can relax: There are ways to ensure that your child is well below the mean when it comes to screen time. Here, Sylvia Rimm, PhD, psychologist, Today Show parenting expert, director of the Family Achievement Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio, and author of Growing Up Too Fast (Rodale Press), shares her strategies for raising kids with a balanced TV diet.

Set Limits (the sooner the better)
First, sit down with your child to choose appropriate shows that he or she actually wants to watch. Television then becomes about finding interesting programming rather than channel surfing. "And when you do this with children from a very young age, they will have internalized this idea by the time they're teenagers," explains Dr. Rimm, "They'll usually turn on the television only for something specific, and they'll know that there are other activities that are at least equally rewarding." Each school year and summer vacation can begin with a family sit-down focused on picking shows your children are allowed to watch. (It's never too late to initiate this tradition.)

Jump to full text of this article here.



Categories: Family, Newsletter,


New FeatureRelated Articles: Full-Time Rewards from Part-Time Work, Parenting Time is Not Your Time,