47

MomTalk.com November 17, 2017:   The women's magazine for moms about children, family, health, home, fashion, careers, marriage & more


MomTalk Most Popular Articles

Most Popular Articles



Sign Up for the MomTalk newsletter today!





Email Marketing by VerticalResponse




Instantly watch from thousands of TV episodes & movies streaming from Netflix. Try Netflix for FREE!



152403_Mar Coupon Code 125x125

Zazzle launches customizable Doodle Speakers

zulily: Daily deals for moms, babies and kids

126905_Shop Green Baby at Diapers.com + Free 2 Day Shipping on $49+

307728_Save Better - 125x125

Women May Get Diabetes Earlier Than Men

Women may show signs of diabetes far earlier than men, according to new research. The findings could lead to new diabetes screening procedures to help identify who is at greatest risk of developing the disease.

Researchers from the University of Buffalo studied newly identified risk factors for type 2 diabetes, a disease of metabolism in which the body produces insufficient amounts or fails to use insulin, the hormone needed for cells to process glucose. This leads to a buildup of glucose in the bloodstream.

Women may show signs of diabetes far earlier than men, according to new research. The findings could lead to new diabetes screening procedures to help identify who is at greatest risk of developing the disease.

Researchers from the University of Buffalo studied newly identified risk factors for type 2 diabetes, a disease of metabolism in which the body produces insufficient amounts or fails to use insulin, the hormone needed for cells to process glucose. This leads to a buildup of glucose in the bloodstream. Type 2 diabetes increases the risk of developing heart disease, stroke, eye and kidney diseases and other chronic illnesses.

According to the National Institutes of Health, an estimated 20.8 million Americans-7 percent of the population-had diabetes in 2005, 6.2 million of them undiagnosed. Of the diabetic population, an estimated 90 to 95 percent had the most common form of the disease, type 2 diabetes. In addition, government estimates indicate that at least 43 million Americans have prediabetes, a condition that occurs when blood glucose levels are high but not high enough to be classified as diabetes.

Jump to full text of this article here.



Categories: Women's Health,


New FeatureRelated Articles: Diabetes and Pregnancy, Your Children's Health: Diabetes Center,