47

MomTalk.com January 23, 2018:   The women's magazine for moms about children, family, health, home, fashion, careers, marriage & more


MomTalk Most Popular Articles

Most Popular Articles



Sign Up for the MomTalk newsletter today!





Email Marketing by VerticalResponse




Instantly watch from thousands of TV episodes & movies streaming from Netflix. Try Netflix for FREE!



152403_Mar Coupon Code 125x125

Zazzle launches customizable Doodle Speakers

zulily: Daily deals for moms, babies and kids

126905_Shop Green Baby at Diapers.com + Free 2 Day Shipping on $49+

307728_Save Better - 125x125

Strengthening Father-Child Bonds

The bond between mother and child gets a lot of attention, but what about the bonds between fathers and their children? Research out of Pennsylvania State University and the University of California has shown that father-child interactions are central to everything from a child's ability to regulate emotionally to the capacity to maintain strong, fulfilling social relationships later in life.

By Darcy Lockman

The bond between mother and child gets a lot of attention, but what about the bonds between fathers and their children? Research out of Pennsylvania State University and the University of California has shown that father-child interactions are central to everything from a child's ability to regulate emotionally to the capacity to maintain strong, fulfilling social relationships later in life. Here, with the help of Steven Richfield, PhD, child psychologist and author of The Parent Coach: A New Approach to Parenting in Today's Society (Sopris West), we provide quick, simple ways for dads to boost their bonds with their sons and daughters.

Show (Don't Tell) Your Love
Psychologists believe that mothers and fathers provide different kinds of physical stimulation and comfort for small children. When fathers as well as mothers are involved, children can stretch their capacities both emotionally and physically. In the first few years especially, this is largely about expressions of physical comfort and affection. "Saying I love you is not enough," says Dr. Richfield. "Demonstrating that in heartfelt ways -- caressing infants, taking toddlers' hands, picking them up when they're crying, snuggling at night -- tangible physical displays of affection are very important with young children. This kind of interaction can be difficult for some men, especially those who didn't get that from their own fathers when they were little. But it is first and foremost for me: clear demonstrations of love, provided in unambiguous, consistent ways."



Categories: Family,


New FeatureRelated Articles: Strengthening the Grandparent Bond, Fearful Child Can Become Brave: Sylvia Rimm on Raising Kids,