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MomTalk.com November 20, 2017:   The women's magazine for moms about children, family, health, home, fashion, careers, marriage & more


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Breaking the Code of Dyslexia

Imagine trying to read a book in a foreign language. You know that the symbols and marks on the page must mean something, but no matter how hard you try to sound them out, you can't put the pieces together into understandable words. That's what it feels like to have dyslexia.



Dyslexia is a learning disorder characterized by difficulties in reading, writing and spelling. It is genetic in nature, affecting how one's brain processes written language and even how it stores information for short-term work.

By Karen Barrow

Imagine trying to read a book in a foreign language. You know that the symbols and marks on the page must mean something, but no matter how hard you try to sound them out, you can't put the pieces together into understandable words.

That's what it feels like to have dyslexia.

Dyslexia is a learning disorder characterized by difficulties in reading, writing and spelling. It is genetic in nature, affecting how one's brain processes written language and even how it stores information for short-term work. Quite often, the people it affects are intelligent, but they have trouble learning in a world that they cannot understand as efficiently as everyone else.

"People with dyslexia have told me over and over that they feel like they have to exert more mental effort than others do with written language," says Dr. Virginia Berninger, director of the University of Washington's Learning Disabilities Center.

Making matters worse, this language barrier prevents effective written communication. For example, a child with dyslexia may be able to tell wonderful stories, but when it comes to writing them down, he's at a loss: letters become inverted, spelling is all wrong and it becomes so frustrating he just gives up. Jump to full text of this article here.



Categories: Children's Health, Health & Wellness,


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